At an energy conference in Athens, late September, energy ministers of both Greek Cyprus and Israel met to discuss ways to channel east Mediterranean gas to Europe via a Greek pipeline. A feasibility study on the 1,300km offshore pipeline designed to transport up to 16bcm/y of gas is due to be presented by November 2016, reported Reuters.

The Israeli Energy Minister, Yuval Steinitz, stated that Israel wanted more than one export route to channel natural gas discoveries in the eastern Mediterranean to Europe. The available delivery options to Europe range from a pipeline linking the three countries, a pipeline via Turkey, or the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) storage facilities in Egypt,  according to Hurriyet Daily News.

Steinitz added: “my policy is that at the end of the day we have to have at least two of these pipes in order to have more than one option.”

These talks came as Israel has discovered more than 900bcm of natural gas offshore, with some indications pointing to another 2,200bcm waiting to be tapped. The country is considering to “re-open its economic waters” before the end of 2016 to allow a licensing round for commercial bidding over maritime blocks.