In continued efforts of the government of Iraq to meet electricity demands, the Ministry of Electricity inked a $1.4b deal with General Electric (GE) for the construction of two power plants, along with technological upgrades and maintenance services, Rudaw reported.

The power plants, each with a capacity of 750 MW, will be built in the provinces of Dhi Qar and Muthanna at a total cost of $1.05b, scheduled to be completed by 2018, informed Ekurd Daily.

The contract was signed by Iraqi Electricity Minister, Qasim al-Fahdawi, and GE’s Power President and CEO, Steve Bolze, in a signing ceremony attended by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

According to the United Nations Development Program, Iraqi households receive 14.6 hours of electricity daily through public or private generators, and 90% of households utilize private generators.

Iraq’s peak electricity demand was 2.1GW in the summer and the grid is only able to supply about 1.3GW.

Electricity supplies collapsed in the chaos after the US invasion in 2003, when power plants were looted or not properly maintained. Militants have targeted transmission towers and other infrastructure in subsequent years, while the government in Baghdad has been unable to keep up with demand.